Building Team Trust

Happy Monday to you all!

This week in a private coaching group with Top Practices Virtual Practice Management Institute I will begin a 4-week series on “Team Trust.”  I thought I would share some key points to developing trust within any work team.

Trust among team members is necessary for the team to function at a high level.  Actually, for the team to function at any level well there needs to be trust.

Trust is a key factor to the team’s productivity, the quality of work they do and morale.  If there is any mistrust amongst team members it will drain the entire team of their time and energy and cause a toxic environment and eventual destruction of the team itself.

Trust, like respect, has to be earned over a period of time. In the workplace that can be difficult because when someone is hired to do a job you need to place immediate trust in them that they will be able to do it.

In the medical field physicians can be placed at risk by their employees making errors that may put their patients at risk, so trust is an essential element in physician / employee relationships.

Here are three definitions of what trust is;

(1) Trust is assured reliance on the character, ability, strength or truth of someone or something.

(2) Trust; one in which confidence is placed.

(3) Trust means being able to predict what other people will do and what situations will occur. If we can surround ourselves with people we trust, then we can create a safe and good environment in which to work.

These three definitions all sound wonderful, but how do we develop “trust” with those we work with since it is an essential factor that needs to be in the workplace?  There a several stepping-stones to building trust between employers and employees and between co-workers, it will not happen overnight, trust is earned over time.

Here are a few key steps to begin to build trust with others that have proven over time do develop that bond of trust between people in the workplace setting;

  • Be honest, sounds logical and easy, but I can tell you that I have had employees lie right to my face and they know that I know it. But for some reason because they said something, I am to believe it is true when evidence shows differently. Be honest at all costs, as it is better to have been honest when you have done something wrong then to have lied and then later been found out.  Repairing this type of damage with an employer or co-worker is very hard.
  • Try to consistently use good judgment, do not talk about those you work with unless it is in an uplifting way.  Bad mouthing someone or gossip will be found out and is looked down upon.  Think before you act, that extra 10 seconds of thought may save your reputation.
  • Be dependable, show up for work each day on time.  Do the work that is expected of you and then some.  Under promise and over deliver, doing this says a lot about the type of person you are.
  • Take the time to listen to others and value them for who they are.  Support your employer and co-workers 100% and employers do the same for your employees.  Work together finding ways that you can help one another do a better job each day for those patients that you serve.

Take the time to thank each other each day for a good days work.  These steps may sound simple, but it is truly amazing how many people will tell you that they do not happen in their place of employment.  It does take time to build the bond of trust, but it is hard for me to imagine working day in and out in an environment that it does not exist.

Ralph Waldo Emerson said it best; “Trust men and they will be true to you; treat them greatly and they will show themselves great.” 

Today, is a new day, make sure you are taking the steps to build the bonds of trust with those you work with, it is so worth it.

Top Practices Practice Management

 

 

 

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